Ford Fiesta ST secret salt mine advert – is this deepest Carrick?

29 Replies

Ford unveiled a sensational new advert for the Fiesta ST this week, featuring World Rally Championship driver Elfyn Evans piloting the car at speed, 400m below ground in a salt mine.  This advert, called “Undertrack “, is the latest instalment of the Greatest Driving Roads series of short films featuring the Blue Oval’s performance vehicles.

Ford Fiesta ST secret salt mine advert - is this deepest Carrick?

Ford had previously taken the Ford GT, Focus RS and Mustang Convertible to some of the most stunning environments across the continent, including the Arctic Circle in Norway and the sunny climes of Mallorca. Ford has been tight-lipped about the whereabouts of this underground location, but is it, in fact, deepest, darkest Carrickfergus?

Ford Fiesta ST secret salt mine advert - is this deepest Carrick?

All Ford will say is that it was shot 400 metres below ground in one of Europe’s largest salt mines. The advert opens with a shot of the Fiesta ST on Oxford Street in Belfast City centre and includes footage of the car on the M3 flyover.  This makes us believe that the incredible subterranean blast, through 60 kilometres of tunnels, took place at the Kilroot rock salt mine, near Carrickfergus.

In the film, Elfyn Evans is seen at the wheel of the Fiesta ST slipping, sliding and jumping in the dirt. The sound of the zesty 1.5-litre EcoBoost engine is amplified by its surroundings as it tackles a high-speed drop through the narrow, entrance tunnel.

Ford Fiesta ST secret salt mineTemperatures in the mine are kept at a constant 16°C and safety precautions required that a skeleton crew was used for the three-day shoot.  Leo Roeks, Ford Performance director said: “The drama of the tunnels and the chance to show off Fiesta ST’s ability on a different type of surface were a big part of choosing this unique location. It wasn’t a typical race track, it was somewhere we could drive this great car to its full potential.”  

Ford Fiesta ST secret salt mine

Evans, who is a dab hand at driving fast Fords in tricky conditions, was impressed by the experience: “The salt is actually like fine gravel to drive on, quite slippery to be honest, especially on road tyres. You expect it to be claustrophobic but actually, it’s quite the opposite, a great place to really enjoy the new Fiesta ST.”

So is the advert shot in Belfast and a Kilroot salt mine? Watch the video below and make your own mind up!

 

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About Author

Chris, known as Cess on the forums, is a long time RMS member. He is a fervent motorsports enthusiast and lover of all things automotive. He can be found on the ditches of most Irish rallies, at Mondello watching drifting or in front of the TV watching motorbike racing.

RMS Forum Comments

Cooper 12:09 | Wed 11 Jul, 2018 | Report
How does this effect the Fiesta's 3 year/36,000 mile anti-corrosion warranty? Plus how awesome do those caves look!
adam1942 12:22 | Wed 11 Jul, 2018 | Report
Would love a tour of that salt mine
BarryPort 12:24 | Wed 11 Jul, 2018 | Report
I was told because the salt mines have little to no moisture corrosion doesn’t take place & that there’s an old Land Rover down there that’s immaculate ^o)
natogreen16v 12:29 | Wed 11 Jul, 2018 | Report
Certainly looks like the salt mine although most look the same from what I've worked in them. Imagine the noise :grinning:
Polobrat666 12:46 | Wed 11 Jul, 2018 | Report
| I was told because the salt mines have little to no moisture corrosion doesn’t take place & that there’s an old Land Rover down there that’s immaculate ^o)
Yep. When they sell/upgrade equipment it's buried in salt for shipment, a colleagues dad used to rig the explosives in it
rupertfinch 12:57 | Wed 11 Jul, 2018 | Report
| I was told because the salt mines have little to no moisture corrosion doesn’t take place & that there’s an old Land Rover down there that’s immaculate ^o)
Just about to say that. It's taking them back and forth to the surface that knackers them quickly. Never encountered the ones that are based purely underground, but the one I rode in wasn't very old and I wouldn't like to be poking too hard with a screwdriver! Never felt pure darkness like it standing at one of the working faces. Epic place.
BarryPort 13:37 | Wed 11 Jul, 2018 | Report
| Just about to say that. It's taking them back and forth to the surface that knackers them quickly. Never encountered the ones that are based purely underground, but the one I rode in wasn't very old and I wouldn't like to be poking too hard with a screwdriver! Never felt pure darkness like it standing at one of the working faces. Epic place.
I’ve welded anodes underswater to protect their pier but that’s as close as I got to their mine(s).
407_hdi 13:40 | Wed 11 Jul, 2018 | Report
I think it's Belfast/Carrick alright, the bit at the end looks like the new buildings beside the M3 bridge
amg306 13:48 | Wed 11 Jul, 2018 | Report
| I was told because the salt mines have little to no moisture corrosion doesn’t take place & that there’s an old Land Rover down there that’s immaculate ^o)
Was talking to the guy that maintains the Land Rovers, think that used to be the case when they stayed in the mines, but they come up to ground at the end of each shift now and arent lasting at all.
Apis 14:09 | Wed 11 Jul, 2018 | Report
| I was told because the salt mines have little to no moisture corrosion doesn’t take place & that there’s an old Land Rover down there that’s immaculate ^o)
They have archive document stores down there. the paper stays dry.


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